Full Submersion Niagara Falls

September 8, 2016.Vicki Leavy.1 Like.0 Comments

Wondrous! Breathtaking! Bucket List!  We’d read the brochures and recommendations online for how to best see and experience Niagara Falls. Since neither of us had ever seen them, we decided to have as much interaction with the water as possible, without actually going over in a barrel. To say it’s commercialized is an understatement. Learning that the Army Corp of Engineers can actually turn them off and divert most of the water flow to reservoirs for hydroelectric…disheartening. BUT, did the experience live up to our expectations? ABSOLUTELY!

Approaching Niagara Falls

Approaching Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls fron the American side

Niagara Falls fron the American side

Niagara Falls looking at American side. Bridal Veil on the right.

Niagara Falls looking at American side. Bridal Veil on the right.

 

Niagara Falls (Horsehoe Falls) on Canadian side.

Niagara Falls (Horsehoe Falls) on Canadian side.

We booked full American and Canadian tours, but decided to take a pre-peek on our own. The mist created by the falls was visible for miles. It resembles smoke from a forest fire. We heard it before we saw it. As we approached the first precipice on foot…it became eerily quiet. Falling water doesn’t make much noise. Landing water does!  It’s not just a sound. It’s so much more. It’s louder than thunder. It can be felt in the chest and teeth. It’s in the air. It’s breathed, tasted, smelled, felt. The mist is like rain in varying degrees of light to heavy depending on the breeze and the moment. It’s wonderfully unpredictable! People had umbrellas. We wanted to get wet! “Bring it on, Niagara Falls!” Let’s see what you’re made of.

View point on Canadian side

View point on Canadian side

Kirk & Vicki after walking into the Cave of the Winds at the bottom of the flass on the American side

Kirk & Vicki after walking into the Cave of the Winds at the bottom of the flass on the American side

In the eye of the hurricane at the bottom of the falls on the American side.

In the eye of the hurricane at the bottom of the falls on the American side.

 

 

The tours were fantastic. We learned, watched, were fascinated and yes…we got wet — REALLY wet! Free ponchos didn’t keep us dry. Free slippers maybe kept us from slipping. Cave of the Winds, Maid of the Mist, Journey Behind the Falls, The Great Falls Portal, and every other portal in the tunnel behind the third largest waterfall on planet earth. We walked every path, stood on every observation deck, toured upstream and downstream, and even looked at the hydroelectric plants. After three days of everything Niagara Falls, our grand finale was a trip up the glass elevators to the observation deck of the Skylon, where we watched the gentle and gradual lighting of the falls as dusk fell gradually to darkness.

Niagara Falls at night from the Skylon Tower on the Canadian side

Niagara Falls at night from the Skylon Tower on the Canadian side

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